Nancy Rosenthal

Nancy Rosenthal
Nancy Rosenthal
Nancy Rosenthal

My interest in art began with stained glass and acrylic painting.  It wasn’t until I took a wheel-throwing course that I fell in love with creating in clay.  I continued to develop my abilities for several years, working under the respected and talented sculptor, Rosalia Riera.  Nature inspires me and my love of wildlife has given me endless sources for expression in my clay work.  I let the clay tell me what it wants to become. Continue reading “Nancy Rosenthal”

Nancy E. Richards

Nancy Richards
Nancy Richards
Nancy Richards

In paintings and mixed media pieces, I use a variety of techniques to explore and celebrate color, line and texture.  Inspired by nature, I use watercolors, acrylics, alcohol inks, gouache, pastels and enhanced monoprints in abstract or representational ways to express the sense of wonder and joy that I find in the world around me.  Each medium has its own properties, and they inform each other, conveying vision, surprise, harmony and the beauty of finding one’s place in the natural world. Continue reading “Nancy E. Richards”

Marian Miller

Marian Miller
Marian Miller
Marian Miller

My work is inspired by the geography and nature that surrounds us, but it can be challenging to represent a landscape, flower or bird in stained glass.  I must draw out a design that considers the way that glass will break when scored with a hand-cutter.  Most of my work is done in the traditional “copper-foil” method perfected by Tiffany, but I often incorporate an element that has been fused in a kiln, manipulated with a torch or overlaid with molten solder detail on copper.  Fusing many layers of stained glass in a very hot kiln comprises some of my work. Continue reading “Marian Miller”

Marcia Brennan

Marcia Brennan
Marcia Brennan
Marcia Brennan

My paper mache pieces lean toward humor, whimsy and portraying our local animal neighbors.

I start with an armature of chicken wire, Styrofoam or cardboard boxes and tubes.  Each piece is layered with newspaper, tissue paper and white glue.  After several coats of paint and some attention to the face and eyes, they seem to take on a life of their own, and I’m ready to let them go. Continue reading “Marcia Brennan”

Kevin Felderhoff

Kevin Felderhoff
Kevin Felderhoff
Kevin Felderhoff

I take notice of the artistry in the imperfections of salvaged wood and seek to enhance the beauty inside each piece.  The most interesting pieces are turned end grain and the most dramatic pieces come from logs or branches that have very irregular shapes, far away from round.  Some of my favorite turnings are the flying winged vase and a cowboy hat.  The flying winged vase is turned down the end grain from a crotch so when turning the piece, it appears to have wings.  The wooden cowboy hat starts off as a 200-pound log transformed into a 23-ounce wearable cowboy hat.  Besides turning, I also enjoy designing furniture and unique home décor. Continue reading “Kevin Felderhoff”

John E. Davis

John David
John David
John David

I find simplicity, beauty and a timeless honesty in wild places, wild things and those occupations dependent on the land and sea.  They evoke in me a peaceful feeling not unlike that of going home.  My art seeks to convey this sense of peace and place to others.

If you want to truly see a thing, try to paint it.  While I don’t consider myself strictly a plein air artist, all of my paintings begin outside.  I have to spend time in a place or with an animal to experience it and see the light upon it. Continue reading “John E. Davis”

Joe Bruneau

Joe Bruneau
Joe Bruneau
Joe Bruneau

My basket weaving experience began while I was an art student at Warren Wilson College.  In 1983, early in my curriculum, a Fiber Arts course opened my eyes to the potential of natural materials as well as found objects.  When the Appalachian basketry was taught, I found something that spoke to me.  When I completed my first basket, I felt I had made a vessel that was meant to nurture and held purpose.  Since that first experience, I have not stopped exploring potential in all materials…playing with color, texture, and shape with my baskets.  Materials typically used for the frames are grapevine, honeysuckle, bittersweet, and wisteria, along with hand-dyed rattan for the body of the basket. Continue reading “Joe Bruneau”

Jerry Maxey

Jerry Maxey
Jerry Maxey
Jerry Maxey

My work is wicker-weave basketry of dyed rattan and sea grass cord, with lathe-turned wood bases and rims.  The wood is all found wood, often trees that have fallen in storms.  Once I have turned the wooden elements, I leave them indoors for at least three weeks to cure and stabilize.  I attach rattan spokes to the wood and construct the basket, weaving in the colors and patterns as I go.  When completed, the entire piece is finished with tung oil to bring out the colors and produce a slight aged patina to the work. Continue reading “Jerry Maxey”

Janet Leazenby

Janet Leazenby
Janet Leazenby
Janet Leazenby

I have been intrigued with organic qualities in clay from a young age.  Trying to inject a living and dancing quality into the clay has been a goal of mine for a very long time.  I use “Slung Slabs” on collar areas of vessels, ears, or beaks on my animals.  Using “Slung Slabs” stretches and infuses pieces with a permanent sense of movement. Continue reading “Janet Leazenby”